Brian Crane, Ph.D., RPA, Archae 3D LLC, bdcrane@archae3d.com

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Probable root cellar excavations carried out by the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology next to the 1716 Mouns Jones House. The photogrammetry model was buildt from 288 photographs in Agisoft Photoscan Pro. House NW wall and north arrow/scale bar added in Maya 2016 for reference. Scale bar is in 20cm increments. The site is owned by the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County.

Sub-floor cellar feature found beneath a 19th-century Shotgun House during volunteer archaeological excavations led by the Washington, DC. Historic Preservation Office.

You can find a model of the whole house foundation here.

Medium resolution detail view of a probable root cellar feature. Excvations carried out by the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology Chapter 21 next to the 1716 Mouns Jones House. The photogrammetry model was buildt from 288 photographs in Agisoft Photoscan Pro. The scale bars display 20cm increments. The original cellar vault stones have been displaced. The apparent alignment of the articulated foundation stones are indicated by the blue markers. The alignment markers, north arrow and scale bars were added in Maya 2016. The site is owned by the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County.

Photogrammetry model of the Coan Hall archaeological site, Northern Neck, Virginia. The excavations show the foundations of a late 17th-century house, and part of a cellar.

Low/medium resolution model built from approximately 450 photographs, supplemented with a normal map derived from a high resolution polygon model. The site was excavated by University of Tennessee Archaeological Field School. Photography conducted in July 2017.

Reconstructed colonoware vessel from a mid 18th-mid-19th-century brick making site on the banks of the Back River on Joint Base Charleston, SC. The vessel was found and partially recovered during National Register evaluation testing conducted by Versar, Inc. for the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. Individual sherds from the base and part of the body were physically mended then recorded using photogrammetry in Agisoft Photoscan. The separate pieces were then oriented to each other and a hypothetical vessel outline added in Autodesk Maya. Virtual reconstruction shows the vessel would have been approximately 13 cm tall and 18 cm wide. The opening may have been approximately 12.5 cm in diameter. Given these measurements, the vessel could have held approximately 1.7 liters, which is typical of colonoware pots or jars of this shape found in the Carolina Lowcountry.

Eighteenth-century salt-glazed stoneware tankard.

Site Photogrammetry